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U.S.-Russian relations

Stanislav Byshok: Russians applauding a U.S. president is a sign of the times

It's weird, but it's great, and for the first time ever Russians are applauding the victory of a U.S. presidential candidate. It's a sign of the times. For the past years we have had a very tense relationship so when a person who is perceived in Russia as being neutral to Russia and who is realistic about foreign policy was elected, it was greeted with joy. Read more about Stanislav Byshok: Russians applauding a U.S. president is a sign of the times

Putin: Russia’s Last Remaining Pragmatist? (The National Interest)

Russian-American relations are at their frostiest levels since the cold war. Can the two sides reach an accommodation? Or are relations doomed to continue their downward spiral? Read more about Putin: Russia’s Last Remaining Pragmatist? (The National Interest)

Buchanan: U.S.-Russia Clash in Ukraine?

Among Cold War presidents there was an unwritten rule: Do not challenge Moscow in its Central and Eastern Europe sphere of influence. In crises over Berlin in 1948 and 1961, the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 and the Warsaw Pact invasion of Prague in 1968, U.S. forces in Europe stayed in their barracks. We saw the Elbe as Moscow’s red line, and they saw it as ours. Read more about Buchanan: U.S.-Russia Clash in Ukraine?